The personal blog of Stuart Breckenridge

A .Mac Apple ID and Sign in with Apple

The story of my Apple ID:

  • It was a @mac.com email address created in the days of .Mac
  • I let the .Mac subscription expire before the transition to MobileMe
  • When signing into Mail on the Mac, I created an @icloud.com address for my Apple ID
  • This became Primary Email Address for my Apple ID

This chain of events created a problem with both my Apple ID and Sign in with Apple.

First, the Apple ID website wouldn’t let me change my Apple ID from @mac.com to the @icloud.com address. In fact, despite the option to change my Apple ID being available, when I attempted to change it the website froze.

Second, as a result of the above, when using Sign in with Apple I had no way to resolve the following problem using the Hide my email address option:

  • Only the @mac.com address was available; and,
  • Signing in always failed; and,
  • The failure reason was never given1

The only available solution to this problem? Raise a support ticket with Apple and ask them to replace your Apple ID with your Primary Email Address.

It took nine days for this change to be made on my account, and an escalation to Engineering, but it has solved all of the above problems.2

  1. A failure reason wasn’t presented to the user or via the delegate to the developer. ↩︎

  2. When the change was made all my devices started asking for my password at once. ↩︎


Apple Card Found to Contain 90% Titanium and 10% Aluminium

Joe Rossignol, for Macrumors:

Bloomberg Businessweek sent an Apple Card to University of California, Berkeley professor and mineralogist Hans-Rudolf Wenk to determine the card’s atomic makeup. The answer: 90% titanium and 10% aluminium.

Not to nitpick, but this is probably the least rumoury article on Macrumors. It is an actual fact about the atomic makeup of an actual physical product.

P.S. I corrected the spelling of aluminium.


Singapore Transit Summer Update

Singapore Transit is undergoing some major changes in order to support iOS 13 and watchOS 6.

The nearby bus stops, bus arrivals, and MRT/LRT service status views have all seen some level of redesign. The Traffic Incident screen has been completely redesigned. Typography has been refreshed throughout, accessibility support has been improved further, and the app supports both light and dark mode. Finally, database updates — new bus stops and routes — are now delivered in the background rather than through updates via the App Store.

The Watch app that shipped with v1 and v2 has been…deleted. It is currently in the process of being rebuilt from scratch using SwiftUI1. The plan is for it have, as far as possible, feature parity with the iOS app.

The next version of Singapore Transit will also switch to date based versioning. The first version will be Singapore Transit 2019, then 2019.1, and so on. This is for simplicity more than anything else.

When’s all this coming?

I’m targeting late October. This should give the majority of current users enough time to upgrade to iOS 13 and watchOS 6, which will be the minimum supported versions.

  1. This has hit a slight delay as TestFlight doesn’t seem to support builds that use Combine. I’ve raised a feedback incident: FB6992845. ↩︎


Lucky Dip with SwiftUI and Combine

My first iPhone app — in hindsight, my first UIKit app — was called Lucky Dip, and I released it about eight years ago. It was a little utilty that helped you pick lottery numbers for four different lottery games available in the UK.

Lucky Dip

With last week’s introduction of SwiftUI and Combine at WWDC, I though I’d build a new version of Lucky Dip to get some experience with these new technologies.

It turns out it didn’t take too long and it’s pretty much done.

Lucky Dip with SwiftUI

I’ll be putting the source code on GitHub soon.


WWDC 2019 Wish List

It’s very close to that time of the year when all our Swift code breaks we get lots of new API to play with. Below is my work in progress list of features I’d like to see.

MapKit

  • Dark mode for maps. If there is to be a dark mode for iOS system-wide, I’d like an API that allows me to give the user a controllable dark mode for UIMapView.
  • Access to transit overlays. At the moment transit overlays, e.g. bus routes or MRT lines, are not available via any public API.
  • Snap to roads. Give developers an option to snap an MKPolyline to a road.
  • Increased direction request limit. You can currently get directions for up to 50 waypoints before you are rate limited. When calculating bus routes there are usually more than 50 waypoints, so that means using a less accurate MKPolyline to represent the route. This could be negated by giving access to transit overlays.

Alternative Icons

  • Alternative icon management. Move alternative icons to the asset catalog and remove the need to configure via Info.plist.

GameKit

  • Refresh the whole thing. GameKit has been neglected for so long. The documentation hasn’t been updated in over three years and there aren’t, as far as I can tell, any Swift code samples. It’d make sense for Apple, given their new focus on games, to really revamp GameKit.

Xcode

  • Storyboard performance. Make this faster, please.
  • Customisations. Via Becky Hansmeyer:

    every visual customization that is possible for a UI component should be editable in Interface Builder

  • SourceKit. LSP
  • Navigation. Clearer UI for different targets within the Navigator area.

Font Management

  • Asset catalog. Put fonts in the asset catalog and remove the need to configure embedded fonts via Info.plist.

Analytics

  • Framework. A first-party, privacy focused analytics framework, to challenge Firebase and App Center.



MacBook Pro 2019

Chance Miller, 9to5Mac:

Apple has announced today that it is upgrading the MacBook Pro with faster 8th- and 9th-generation Intel Core processors. This revision marks the first time that the MacBook Pro has been available in an 8-core configuration. The new MacBook Pro models also feature a revised keyboard design.

[…]

In addition to the faster processors, Apple says the new MacBook Pros feature a new iteration of its Butterfly keyboard technology. Apple is including the new keyboard on the new 13-inch and 15-inch MacBook Pros released today. Apple didn’t offer any details on whether or not the new keyboard design would also make its way to other Butterfly keyboard Macs, such as the MacBook Air.

In addition, Apple is expanding its keyboard-replacement program. Joanna Stern, for the Wall Street Journal:

Apple on Tuesday said it was changing a material used in its butterfly keyboards and expanding its keyboard-repair program. The program previously covered first- and second-generation keyboards, but now includes coverage of the third-generation keyboards introduced last year on MacBook Air and high-end MacBook Pro models.

The fact that all butterfly keyboards, from first-gen through to today’s redesign, are covered by the replacement program is a good thing. However, it doesn’t fill me with confidence that Apple has got to the bottom of what’s making the keyboards so unreliable.


Becky Hansmeyer: WWDC 2019 Developer Wishlist and Keynote Predictions

Via Becky Hansmeyer’s WWDC 2019 Wishlist:

stop making us […] write dumb hacks like adding a blank UIImage as a navigation bar’s “shadow” just to get rid of that line beneath it

I used to do this for Singapore Transit and it was incredibly annoying. However, a simpler approach is available (though still not ideal):


navigationController?.navigationBar.setValue(true, forKey: "hidesShadow")

That said, I think UINavigationBar does need to have support added for multi-line title labels in both normal and large title mode.


Powerbeats Pro Not Available Until June in Singapore

Joe Rossignol, Macrumors:

While the black Powerbeats Pro remain listed as “coming soon” on Apple’s online store elsewhere, recently updated fine print on the Beats website indicates that the earphones will begin their worldwide rollout later in May and June.

Powerbeats Pro will be available to pre-order in black later in May in the United Kingdom, France, and Germany, followed by Australia, Singapore, China, Japan, Hong Kong, Korea, Austria, Italy, Spain, Ireland, The Netherlands, Belgium, Russia, Switzerland, Sweden, Mexico, and Brazil in June, according to the fine print.

Not great as I wanted to buy them before this year’s Sundown Marathon.1

  1. My left AirPod only lasts about 40 minutes on a full charge these days. That’s barely long enough to get through about a 7km run. ↩︎